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  • Author: Genfeng Yu x
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Genfeng Yu Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Siyang Liu Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Cheng Song Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Qintao Ma Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Xingying Chen Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Yuqi Jiang Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Hualin Duan Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Yajun He Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Dongmei Wang Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Heng Wan Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Jie Shen Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shunde Hospital, Southern Medical University (The First People's Hospital of Shunde, Foshan), Guangdong, China

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Background

This study aimed to examine the associations of thyroid hormone sensitivity indices, including free triiodothyronine-to-free thyroxine (FT3/FT4) ratio, thyroid feedback quantile-based index by FT4 (TFQIFT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone index (TSHI), and thyrotrophic thyroxine resistance index (TT4RI) with all-cause mortality in euthyroid adults.

Methods

The study included 6243 euthyroid adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2012. FT3/FT4 ratio, TFQIFT4, TSHI, and TT4RI were calculated. The multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression, restricted cubic spline (RCS), and subgroup analysis were conducted.

Results

Individuals in fourth quartile (Q4) had lower all-cause mortality than those in first quartile (Q1) of FT3/FT4 ratio (hazard ratio (HR): 0.70, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.94). Regarding TFQIFT4, individuals in Q4 of TFQIFT4 had a 43% higher all-cause mortality than those in Q1 (HR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.96) (P < 0.05, all). Compared with participants in Q1, no associations of TSHI and TT4RI with mortality were found. TFQIFT4 was linearly and positively associated with mortality. However, the FT3/FT4 ratio showed a U-shaped association with mortality.

Conclusions

Increased risk for all-cause mortality was positively associated with TFQIFT4, suggesting that increased risk for all-cause mortality was associated with decreased central sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Furthermore, the FT3/FT4 ratio showed a U-shaped association with mortality, with an inflection point at 0.5. However, more cohort studies are needed to validate the conclusions.

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