Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 1 of 1 items for

  • Author: Vinciane Muls x
Clear All Modify Search
Ringo Manta Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Saint Pierre, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium

Search for other papers by Ringo Manta in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Charlotte Martin Department of Infectious Diseases, CHU Saint Pierre, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium

Search for other papers by Charlotte Martin in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Vinciane Muls Department of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy, CHU Saint-Pierre, University Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium

Search for other papers by Vinciane Muls in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Kris G Poppe Department of Endocrinology, CHU Saint Pierre, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium

Search for other papers by Kris G Poppe in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

A 22-year-old male with a history of ulcerative colitis and nephrotic syndrome treated with immunomodulatory agents including vedolizumab and mycophenolic acid developed hyperthyroidism 2 weeks following the first administration of BNT162b2 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine). Graves’ disease (GD) was diagnosed based on the elevated thyrotropin-receptor antibody, thyroid scintigraphy and ultrasound. To this day, four cases of new-onset GD following SARS-CoV-2 vaccine were reported in patients with no previous history of thyroid disease. Two cases of recurrence of GD following SARS-CoV-2 vaccine were also reported. Although the underlying mechanisms of vaccine-induced autoimmunity remain to be clarified, there is a rationale for the association between SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and the development of Th1-mediated diseases, at least in predisposed individuals. The BNT162b2 vaccine could be a trigger for GD in some patients. However, the benefit/risk ratio remains by far in favour of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination considering the potentially higher risk of severe infection in these patients.

Open access